Book reviews and creative discussion

Netgalley Review-‘Gone By Midnight’-Candice Fox

Netgalley Review-‘Gone By Midnight’-Candice Fox

‘‘Gone By Midnight  by Candice Fox is due to be published in January 2019 by Penguin and is the third in her ‘Crimson Lake’ series. A regular co-writer with James Patterson, these books are fabulous as either stand alone thrillers or, if you are a pedant like me, you can read them from the start. All of theRead more about Netgalley Review-‘Gone By Midnight’-Candice Fox[…]

Orion BlogTour-‘The Craftsman’ by Sharon Bolton

Orion BlogTour-‘The Craftsman’ by Sharon Bolton

So, as you can see by the banner, I am part of the Orion blogtour to promote the paperback release of ‘The Craftsman’ by Sharon Bolton!

Absolutely thrilled to be involved, this was one of my bookish highlights of the year and is the first in a trilogy from Sharon Bolton.Also, it has been optioned for a television adaptation from the same team who developed ‘Killing Eve’.

I am sure that if you have read this book you will appreciate how cool this is ! I have read all of her books to date and would say that ‘The Craftsman’ is Sharon Bolton’s best work. It brilliantly captures the atmosphere of a small village, a woman police officer at a time when that was unthinkable, and how superstitions spread. There is a creeping, insidious nature of fear that makes your spine tingle when reading it. This demands your full attention until ‘The Craftsman’ has finished with you.

Read more AboutOrion BlogTour-‘The Craftsman’ by Sharon Bolton

Netgalley Book Recommendations-Hunting, shooting and MURDER?!

Netgalley Book Recommendations-Hunting, shooting and MURDER?!

The two Netgalley books I am reviewing run along similar themes-entitlement, luxury getaways and MURDER!

‘The Hunting Party’ by Lucy Foley and ‘STAGS’ by M.A Bennett were both read alongside each other and as they complement each other, I thought it might be fun to focus on them both.

The Hunting Party is published in January 2019 and is the first crime thriller from author Lucy Foley. She sets the scene brilliantly as she details the separate groups of friends travelling to Scotland on an ‘no expense spared’ reunion.

Life has been good to this group of 9 (4 couples and a singleton) who-with the exception of Emma who has been in the ‘gang’ for 3 years as she is dating Mark-, have known each other since their uni days. Apart from Mark and Emma there are Miranda and Julien , Giles and Samira (plus baby Priya), Nick and Bo, and Katie, the lone singleton. Tensions are set right from the off when a seat booking error means one of them has to travel in a separate carriage so Katie takes it as a default for being single-but that does mean she is happy about it? Thisfurther reinforces her station as ‘the one to be pitied for not being partnered’.

 

Read more AboutNetgalley Book Recommendations-Hunting, shooting and MURDER?!

Late Bookish week in review(closer to a fortnight but let’s not quibble!)

Late Bookish week in review(closer to a fortnight but let’s not quibble!)

So this week I have decided to employ a tactic to help me read smarter rather than harder as I seem to have hit a wall of books-not unpleasant, definitely my preferred way to sustain an injury! On the suggestion of an equally book bound friend, she recommended filling a mason jar(see below also quick plug for my Insta feed!) with slips of paper containing all the books I have yet to read.
And to the left is said jar, not allowed to pass on or replace a title when it has been selected. I was genuinely excited to submit to this random no questions asked selection technique and as a result have read 2 books this week.

The first is ‘Everything is Lies‘ by Helen Callaghan(author of the bestselling ‘Dear Amy’) and ‘The Night She Died‘ by Jenny Blackhurst (bestselling author of ‘How I lost You’).

‘Everything is Lies’ is about a 26 year old architect, Sophie, who juggles a high pressure job with her relationship with her parents-off grid hippies who never married and live a bohemian lifestyle.

Read more AboutLate Bookish week in review(closer to a fortnight but let’s not quibble!)

Netgalley Review-‘You Let Me In’ by Lucy Clarke

Netgalley Review-‘You Let Me In’ by Lucy Clarke

I may be wrong but I think this is the first book by Lucy Clarke that I have read and with apologies for using the standard phrase, it was unputdownable (no other word will do).

Available now in e-book format

The cover is menacing, there is a modern looking staircase with a shadow of an ambiguous looking person on the landing between the  2 flights of steps, blood red title words and recommendations by none other than C.L Taylor and Clare Macintosh-high praise indeed-so even before starting it, you are aware that this is going to be a thrill ride of a book.

In it, the narrator, Elle, has returned to the clifftop home that she has bought with the advance in her first, wildly successful novel. It is close to where her sisters and her family live, it’s a familiar environment that she craves after her marriage has floundered and expectations are high for her follow-up book.

After having holidayed in France and on her sister’s suggestion, renting her house on Air Bnb for much a needed financial boost, the moment she comes back to her home is so well described. It’s her home, yet not her home, someone has been living there, but there is little trace of the family that booked it. And yet….there are subtle changes, tiny things that would be overlooked by many but not Elle.

Read more AboutNetgalley Review-‘You Let Me In’ by Lucy Clarke

Weekly Bookish Roundup-Netgalley, random selection,TBR jar

Weekly Bookish Roundup-Netgalley, random selection,TBR jar

Plucked from my Netgalley piles, I accidentally picked two books with similar topics. They each dealt with the topic in different ways that complement each other beautifully so I thought it might be nice, as well as posting about things I am interested in in the world of books, to write a weekly review as well.

Not sure how that will turn out, currently I am juggling the third and final year of nursing school with running a zoo (3 children, 2 cats, a dog and a husband…the jury’s out on who is the most work !)and keeping my handmade crafts business afloat, but it’s worth a try!

So for this week’s review I have Alice Clark-Platt’s ‘The Flower Girls’ (due out 24th January 2019) and Lesley Kara’s ‘The Rumour’ (due out on December 27th 2018).

Read more AboutWeekly Bookish Roundup-Netgalley, random selection,TBR jar

Graphic Novel reviews-‘Redlands’ and ‘Wytches’

Graphic Novel reviews-‘Redlands’ and ‘Wytches’

So I thought to myself, it is nearly midnight, I don’t really want to jump into a new book, I’ll grab a couple of graphic novels which I can start and finish before going to sleep…..

Big mistake. HUGE mistake. The above books were both in my to-read pile, I had read Scott Snyder’s ‘American Vampire’ and Jordie Bellaire was new to be but then I never considered myself a wuss until last night…

Read more AboutGraphic Novel reviews-‘Redlands’ and ‘Wytches’

Netgalley Review-‘Vox’ by Christina Dalcher

Netgalley Review-‘Vox’ by Christina Dalcher

Blogging on my birthday, and what a book to discuss!

I have read some really wonderful books so far this year, but ‘Vox’ has topped them all.

It’s not too hard to envisage a world where America has a president who is seen a joke by the rest of the world, yet manages to systematically take away the rights of the female population.
It starts slowly with the focus on the main character, Jean, a well regarded scientist who was advancing discoveries into cures for a particular strain of dementia. Since the ‘Pure’ movement ,however, women have been stripped of their jobs, their roles and their words.

Women ,and gay people, have been held accountable for the ills of society and in a attempt to return it to a time when women knew their place and being gay was considered an abomination,the president has eroded their rights and gained the backing of American men and female handmaidens .
Inevitable comparison with the ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ aside,it is sadly all too plausible to buy into the future reality that Christina Dalcher depicts. Gay people are forced into work camps and to share cells with the opposite sex until they ‘see sense’. Read more AboutNetgalley Review-‘Vox’ by Christina Dalcher

Weekend Library Book Recommendations- Jennifer Hillier

Weekend Library Book Recommendations- Jennifer Hillier

Any plans for reading something this weekend? Perfect weather for lazing around on a beach….in a park…in the garden …or if you are like me, and hate the sun, hoping for thunder and rain ?

At the moment, I am knee deep in Jennifer Hillier’s ‘Freak’, which apart from adoring the noirish, rainy cover, is also scaring my socks off.

She wrote one of the scariest books I had read in a long time, ‘Wonderland and so when I saw ‘Freak‘ in the library I was in two minds whether to pick it up or not.
So glad that I did! It’s not for the faint of heart, and although it’s a follow up to ‘Creep‘ you can read it as a stand alone.

She also sends out a wicked newsletter and has a new book out that is frankly terrifying in August called ‘Jar Of Hearts‘, link to her website below.
If you like races against time, serial killers, psychological thrillers and menace , you definitely need to check her out!

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Book Recommendation-‘The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter’ by Theodora Goss

Book Recommendation-‘The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter’ by Theodora Goss

So I have just finished what is possibly my favourite book of the year so far, ‘The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter’ by Theodora Goss.

This is the first in a trilogy which is wonderful but also doesn’t seem enough room to explore the stories of these extraordinary women(because it is so good I would ideally love at least 20 books in the series and a HBO tie in, it’s not much to ask!).

The story is told as a narrative by Catherine Moreau with interspersed comments from the main characters , adding snippets on how they feel the book is progressing.

It could be distracting from the pace but it actually adds an intimacy to the story as well as tantalising titbits of other adventures that the ‘Athena Club’, as they come to be known, have been embroiled in.

In the midst of trying to solve the mystery of why ‘ladies of the night’ have been found murdered AND missing organs or limbs, Mary Jekyll, the protagonist, is on a quest to find out what happened to drive her mother to madness, how her father died, and who is this half sister, Diana Hyde, that she suddenly inherits on her mother’s death.

Read more AboutBook Recommendation-‘The Strange Case of the Alchemist’s Daughter’ by Theodora Goss